By Ann M. Little

ISBN-10: 0812219619

ISBN-13: 9780812219616

In 1678, the Puritan minister Samuel Nowell preached a sermon he known as "Abraham in Arms," during which he prompt his listeners to recollect that "Hence it really is no wayes unbecoming a Christian to profit to be a Souldier." The identify of Nowell's sermon used to be good selected. Abraham of the previous testomony resonated deeply with New England males, as he embodied the precise of the householder-patriarch, without delay obedient to God and the unquestioned chief of his kin and his humans in warfare and peace. but enemies challenged Abraham's authority in New England: Indians threatened the protection of his loved ones, subordinates in his family threatened his prestige, and other halves and daughters taken into captivity turned baptized Catholics, married French or Indian males, and refused to come back to New England.In a daring reinterpretation of the years among 1620 and 1763, Ann M. Little unearths how principles approximately gender and kin lifestyles have been critical to the methods humans in colonial New England, and their friends in New France and Indian nation, defined their studies in cross-cultural conflict. Little argues that English, French, and Indian humans had widely comparable principles approximately gender and authority. simply because they understood either war and political energy to be intertwined expressions of manhood, colonial war might be understood as a competition of other kinds of masculinity. for brand new England males, what had as soon as been a masculinity in keeping with family headship, Christian piety, and the obligation to guard kin and religion grew to become one outfitted round the extra summary notions of British nationalism, anti-Catholicism, and soldiering for the Empire.Based on archival learn in either French and English assets, courtroom documents, captivity narratives, and the personal correspondence of ministers and warfare officers, Abraham in palms reconstructs colonial New England as a frontier borderland during which non secular, cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers have been permeable, fragile, and contested by means of Europeans and Indians alike.

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Extra info for Abraham in Arms: War and Gender in Colonial New England (Early American Studies)

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A savage going to his death would not be considered brave if he displayed any feeling under his tortures. " This was a ritual little understood by most European men, who when honored in this fashion greatly disappointed their Indian hosts. 45 Indian men were not only contemptuous of enemies who seemed to behave more like women or children than men. They also frequently in­ sulted opponents by calling them dogs, and complained about being treated like dogs by Europeans. Despite the close association between Indians and their dogs, the insult worked because of dogs' reputation for servility.

Indian men likely questioned English manhood even when it was victorious. Indian men also understood war as a male enterprise, one that was central to their understanding of themselves as men. In fact, political lead­ ership and military prowess were probably even more closely linked among Indians than among the English. Algonquian sachemship was tied very di­ rectly to proven military success, whereas New England's governors and council members tended to be civilian lawyers and merchants. And among the seventeenth-century Iroquois, war was central to their culture, mythol­ ogy, and history.

Indian men also understood war as a male enterprise, one that was central to their understanding of themselves as men. In fact, political lead­ ership and military prowess were probably even more closely linked among Indians than among the English. Algonquian sachemship was tied very di­ rectly to proven military success, whereas New England's governors and council members tended to be civilian lawyers and merchants. And among the seventeenth-century Iroquois, war was central to their culture, mythol­ ogy, and history.

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Abraham in Arms: War and Gender in Colonial New England (Early American Studies) by Ann M. Little


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